Tuesday, October 11, 2011

SPAZ, BROCK & THE GREAT STALL DRIVE


For some reason last night, I let my mind and remote control drift last night and I happened upon the replay of Saturday's beat down in Death Valley. My timing was, of course, absolutely terrible: I tuned in just to review the moment that I thought was the absolute worst of the entire day from a coaching standpoint. Now, I was in the stands the first time and swearing profusely about this drive because it also was the moment the ass-kicking went from "perceived" to "consensual." 

What I'm trying to say is our coaches gave up on trying to make it a game. Down 15 with a full quarter to play, there was a ton of time and, even if we have been underperforming this year, rolling over for an entire quarter is no way to convince kids not to abandon the blowout.

BC came into the fourth quarter having held Clemson to a 47-yard FG after scoring a touchdown on its own, on the ball and actually starting to move it a little. BC got buried deep on the first drive, ran once for a loss followed by two short swing passes to punt. The defense held tight on the next drive before Clemson's Andre Ellington took it to the house from the 35 of 4th and 1*.

*Please note Dabo's aggressive coaching style on this call. Chandler Catanzaro had just hit a kick four yards shorter the possession before and was now kicking with the wind. Instead of taking the three and giving BC a chance for two TDs and a field goal over the last 13 minutes, he went for the kill and it worked.

The next drive and BC's next possession started with a little more than 11 minutes on the clock. From here on out, we can call this The Great Stall Drive

After a nice run back to the 37 by Spiffy Evans on the ensuing kickoff, BC's first play call was a  Tahj Kimble rush. Then BC huddled, with the clock running. Rettig was sacked, and again BC huddled with the clock running. Then a long third down completion gave BC a fresh set of downs...and more clock to run off. Next plays: rush, incomplete, delay of game, long pass for fresh downs. Next set: sack, rush, rush (Rettig keeper) and an incomplete pass to end the drive. All told: 10 plays, nearly six minutes off the clock - and a grand total of 32 yards.

This is what the play calling of a team milking the clock with the lead would look like. It was embarrassing to not give the team the chance to even try to find pay dirt again. Unless Spaz and Brock were trying to keep up the"scoring less than 20 point" streak or found a reason to keep the game at a 22-point margin of victory for the Tigers, there are so few excuses to what happened. Swigert was getting loose over the middle all half, and Larmond was getting single coverage on first and often second downs. There were better options than run, swing pass, pass - especially when losing. Everyone knows that.

It is one thing to lose.

It is another thing to lose without even fighting back.

1 comment:

  1. This drive was disgusting, great job highlighting our coaching staff giving up. This isn't the first time we've done this either.

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